pvMB 3/8/19: Solar tariff exemptions for Turkey and India stay, solar on libraries, schools, and homes oh my!

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Trump trade decisions won’t affect Section 201 exemptions for India, Turkey – SEIA General Counsel and VP of Market Strategy John Smirnow has revealed to pv magazine that the Trump Administration’s recent announcements that it will end the Generalized System of Preferences (GSP) designation for Turkey and India will not affect the two nations’ limited exemption from the global Section 201 tariffs. We’re still not clear on the details of how this works, but either way this is good news for both developers counting on imported modules from these nations, as well as PV makers in these countries. Source: pv magazine/SEIA

 

Hanwha responds to LONGi claims – In the latest back and forth of Hanwha’s IP suit where it is attempting to keep three large PV makers out of the U.S. market, the Korean-German PV maker has issued a statement rebutting LONGi’s claim that it is not subject to the “‘215” patent at the heart of its lawsuit. LONGi argued that the patent covered only ALD processes and that it uses PECVD for its deposition, but Hanwha says that the patent is broad enough to cover multiple deposition processes, and that further it is not restricted to PERC designs. And while Hanwha says it is not trying this in the court of public opinion, it also appears to have contacted the media before notifying the companies it is suing. Source: Hanwha Q Cells

 

Solar systems coming to three Milwaukee libraries – In a step towards meeting the city’s goal of 25% renewably-sourced electricity by 2025, three Milwaukee libraries will be receiving rooftop solar installations. The three libraries; the downtown Milwaukee Central Library, the Tippecanoe branch library on South Howell Avenue and the Center Street Library branch on West Fond du Lac Avenue, will receive a combined 209 kW in capacity. For the city to reach its goal it will need a total installed capacity of 15 MW. Source: The Journal Sentinel

 

Largest public school array completed in Virginia – One dream and 5,200 solar panels later, Fort Defiance High School, which is an awesome name for a school, now has the largest rooftop solar array on a public school in Virginia. The project came at the suggestion of alumnus Elias Nafziger in 2017. The panels are actually split between Wilson Middle School, Wilson Elementary School, Riverheads High School, Riverheads Elementary School, Cassell Elementary, Fort Defiance High School and Clymore Elementary School. Source: Staunton News Leader

 

Putting solar panels on new homes could grow Maine’s solar capacity 15-fold“If builders start putting solar panels on all new Maine homes in 2020, the state could increase its current solar power capacity 15-fold by 2045, according to a new report released today by Environment Maine Research & Policy Center. Such a policy could also cut annual carbon dioxide emissions from energy use by 1.2 percent of 2015 levels by 2045… Nationally, the report finds that if each state adopted a solar homes policy, the U.S. could more than triple its current solar power capacity while cutting annual carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation by more than 9 percent by 2045.” Source: Environment Maine

 

Cypress Creek looking to develop 2 MW in PA – Pennsylvania has a newly-minted 15% by 2021 mandate for renewable sources and Cypress Creek is looking to hop on the development that comes with that with plans to develop a 2 MW solar project in Marshall Township. The proposed 20 acre project would be located at the intersection of 13 Mile Road and L Drive North. If this project gets off the ground, Cypress Creek has no plans of slowing down, as the company is reportedly considering development in Tekonsha, Fredonia, Clarence, Burlington and Athens townships. Source: Battle Creek Enquire

Plus a cool chart looking a the levelized cost of electricity from solar power since 2006. One might argue, wind+solar power pricing has gotten low enough to become the de facto new generation sources – now its time to add some storage.