GameChange Solar caps Massachusetts landfills with 17 MW

The project is part of a growing niche market for solar that can be deployed without disturbing the underlying ground. The U. S. General Accounting Office estimates that there are more than 400,000 brownfields throughout the nation.

A survey by the U.S. conference of Mayors showed that 67 cities identified 11,824 brown field sites in 1993, representing approximately 15,228 acres. The Council also found that 58 cities estimated that, if their brown fields were redeveloped, they could collect anywhere from $872 million to $1.3 billion annually in tax.

Among some of the largest players in the brownfield-to-solar market are utilities. Public Service Electric and Gas, for example, is seeking to invest $275 million in solar installations on New Jersey landfills and brownfields over the mid-term.

Cooperation with the EPA will speed brownfield development. The strict liability provisions contained in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), has left hundreds of thousands of U.S. properties abandoned or underutilized
throughout the nation.
Features of the GameChange design include: supports all poly and thin film panels for all vendors; foundations may be precast at site or nearest precaster location; integrated grounding and wire management; patent pending articulating purlin connections to navigate up to 15 percent terrain slopes; fast install with up to eight inches vertical adjustment with post extender option beyond two inch standard slots; and available in both 1 and 2 panels up in portrait.